Fr. Ken is Reassigned

I am sure that most of you were surprised by my announcement at Mass last weekend. In case you didn’t hear it, or didn’t fully understand, I will repeat it here with some additions.

At the recent PIME Assembly in the USA, I was elected as the Regional Superior. This isFr Ken the same job that I held before I came to St. Mary, Cause of Our Joy in 2016. It is a full time job. It was a surprise and shock to me, as I’m sure it was to all of you. I had planned to stay here as pastor for as long as I could. I know that the parish needed stability from the pastor. My term begins on April 1 and is for four years. I will remain as pastor here until June 30, while the Archdiocese begins its search for a new pastor. On last Sunday afternoon, March 17, an email went out from the Archdiocese to all priests listing the parishes that are looking for a pastor. St. Mary, Cause of Our Joy was one of the three listed.

In addition, due to my new position, I will have to attend the PIME General Assembly (commonly called “Chapter”) in Rome from April 24 – May 24. During that time, other PIME priests in the Detroit area will be assisting for liturgies in the parish. So basically, I will be here from now until just after Easter, and then again from the end of May until June 30.

This was not something that I expected nor did I look for it. I feel that we have built a strong parish community in these past three years, and ask you to continue to support the new pastor as much as you supported me. We have a great leadership team and staff that will continue to make sure that the parish moves forward.

pime_logo_white-cbe6fd7b8dd973d973c8677388276a101ccb6534824b6b2a8e9f3570b763b70eThis position entails many facets: Relating with the PIME priests here in the United States and with the Bishops where we minister, overseeing the mission center in Detroit where we do fundraising and promotion, keeping up to date on the latest trends and issues of the American Church (which includes the current abuse scandal). Our headquarters is presently in Detroit, near the University of Detroit Mercy, just north of 6 Mile Road near Livernois. That building is too large for our present needs and a move in the future in probable.

Please continue to pray for our parish, especially during this transition period, and the new pastor. I promise my prayers as well. I ask that you pray for me and for PIME as well.
Fr. Ken

The Bible and the Virgin Mary

Join our Parish Family as we take part in The Bible and the Virgin Mary, adult faith formation program beginning the week of January 24, 2019 and ending the week of April 11, 2019. This program is part of the St. Paul Center’s Journey Through Scripture series, unveils the mystery of Our Lady that is woven into the fabric of Sacred Scripture. Twelve visually stunning lessons convey the beauty of the doctrine and devotions surrounding Mary, bringing them to life in a powerful, new way.

This class uses discussions based on Scott Hahn’s Hail, Holy Queen and videos presented by dynamic speaker Matthew Leonard. This study has something for everyone from the newly confirmed to the fully engaged cradle Catholic.

Discussion will be on Thursday evenings from 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm with a light meal served from 6:30 pm to 7:00 pm.  Childcare will be provided.  

Download registration form: Here

Week of Prayer for Christian Unity 2019

Please join Saints Constantine and Helen Greek Orthodox Church, Timothy Lutheran Church, MINewburg United Methodist Church, and St. Mary, Cause of Our Joy for a Ecumenical Prayer Service as part of the “Week of Prayer for Christian Unity 2019.” 

Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at 7 PM – 9 PM

This year we will gather at St. Mary, 8200 North Wayne Road, Westland, Michigan 48185. The pastors from each church, as well as the choirs and parishioners will take part in the service. There will be Fellowship after the service.

RESPECT LIFE SUNDAY

Sunday, Oct. 7th is NATIONAL LIFE CHAIN SUNDAY

Every child that isn’t born, but is unjustly condemned
to be aborted, has the face of Jesus Christ, the Lord.”
– Pope Francis

Why is a LIFE CHAIN important in Westland?
AN ABORTION CENTER IS IN WESTLAND where
Pre-born babies in the womb are killed to 6 mo. of
pregnancy! St. Mary Cause of Our Joy’s LIFE CHAIN
Is near the intersection of Wayne & Warren Rds.

FROM 2:00 – 3:30 P.M

Please care! Bring families, friends, & church groups!
A peaceful, prayerful, public witness of Christians who
support the sanctity of life from moment of conception.
Silently we hold an approved pro-life sign:
Abortion Kills Children; Abortion Hurts Women;
Life is the First Inalienable Right; Adoption is the
Loving Option; Jesus Forgives; Pray to End Abortion.

Signs will be provided.

Bring a chair, if needed, & a rosary.
Be in place by 2:00 pm! Spread out! And Pray!

*Do not park in lot adjoining McDonald’s
Restaurant as you risk being towed away!

Responses to Attorney General investigation, September 21, 2018

September 21, 2018

Dear Brothers and Sisters,
By now you will have learned that our State Attorney General has launched an investigation into the Catholic Church in Michigan in regard to acts of sexual abuse of minors by clergy, and the ways these cases were handled by bishops and others in authority. Once again, I affirm:

The Archdiocese of Detroit welcomes the Attorney General’s investigation and is
prepared to fully cooperate. We have worked closely with authorities from all six
counties within our archdiocese since 2002, when we shared past case files involving
clergy misconduct and committed to turning over all new allegations regardless of when the alleged abuse occurred. The Attorney General investigation is the next phase of our commitment to transparency and healing.

We have full confidence in our safe environment policies put in place and carefully  followed for more than 15 years. We remain committed to protecting everyone  –  especially children and vulnerable adults – and therefore look forward to working closely  with officials to determine if there is more we can do to accomplish this goal.

As shepherd of our local church in Detroit, I want to offer my most heartfelt apology for the shame I know you must feel that, because of failures in the Church’s leadership, we have come to this point.  While shame and embarrassment might be an initial reaction, they are not the most important. First and foremost, in the beginning and throughout, we must keep our focus on the healing of the victim – survivors and on our efforts to keep everyone safe in our parishes, schools and all other dimensions of  the Church’s life. I renew to you my pledge to lead all of us in striving ever more vigorously to achieve
these goals.
Most recently, our response to the sexual abuse crisis has led to establishing new action steps to hold bishops accountable for our own personal behavior and for how we have dealt with cases of abuse. The U.S. Bishops’ Conference has already shared some important decisions about this, and I fully endorse them. Further, I will meet soon with all the priests in the archdiocese to discuss further actions we can take to ensure that my pastoral ministry is characterized by integrity, transparency and accountability.

What I have mentioned so far concerns the actions that need to be taken to strengthen the organizational side of our faith -community. While not seeking to skirt the issue of the need for action, as your pastor, I need also to speak to you about the personal, spiritual response to which God the Father calls us in our current situation. I hear him inviting us to renew our faith in him: that he has raised Jesus from the dead and made him Lord of history, not least the history of our time and place; that in the death and resurrection of Jesus is the power to conquer evil, even sins as heinous as those
being uncovered because of this crisis; and that in the outpouring of his precious blood he gives us the singular grace to atone for these sins and heal the wounds that have been inflicted on Christ’s Mystical Body, the Church.

In that light, I ask that you enter into a moment of prayer – kneel if you wish –
and in spirit join with the priest in this prayer from the Chaplet of Divine Mercy, which I’ve edited to focus on our community’s need for mercy:

Eternal Father, I offer you the Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity of Your Dearly Beloved Son, Our Lord, Jesus Christ, in atonement for the sins of clergy sexual abuse and the
failure of those who should have prevented it. For the sake of His sorrowful Passion,
have mercy on us and give healing to all victims-survivors, their families, and to the
whole world.

As I close, I offer again my apology, first of all to victim-survivors and all others so grievously wounded by the sexual abuse of minors by clergy, and for these crimes and failure of leaders to prevent them. Also, I apologize to all of you, members of the Catholic community, for the hurt these sins have caused you. With the help of God, I will continue to lead us on the path toward being the family of faith God calls us to be.

Saint Anne, pray for your Church in Detroit.
Blessed Solanus, pray for us.

Sincerely yours in Christ,
The Most Reverend Allen H. Vigneron
Archbishop of Detroit

For more resources: Click Here

Pope Francis’ response to Sexual Abuse Reports

Link to Original Text

Letter of His Holiness Pope Francis
To the People of God

“If one member suffers, all suffer together with it” (1 Cor 12:26). These words of Saint Paul forcefully echo in my heart as I acknowledge once more the suffering endured by many minors due to sexual abuse, the abuse of power and the abuse of conscience perpetrated by a significant number of clerics and consecrated persons. Crimes that inflict deep wounds of pain and powerlessness, primarily among the victims, but also in their family members and in the larger community of believers and nonbelievers alike. Looking back to the past, no effort to beg pardon and to seek to repair the harm done will ever be sufficient. Looking ahead to the future, no effort must be spared to create a culture able to prevent such situations from happening, but also to prevent the possibility of their being covered up and perpetuated. The pain of the victims and their families is also our pain, and so it is urgent that we once more reaffirm our commitment to ensure the protection of minors and of vulnerable adults.

1. If one member suffers…

In recent days, a report was made public which detailed the experiences of at least a thousand survivors, victims of sexual abuse, the abuse of power and of conscience at the hands of priests over a period of approximately seventy years. Even though it can be said that most of these cases belong to the past, nonetheless as time goes on we have come to know the pain of many of the victims. We have realized that these wounds never disappear and that they require us forcefully to condemn these atrocities and join forces in uprooting this culture of death; these wounds never go away. The heart-wrenching pain of these victims, which cries out to heaven, was long ignored, kept quiet or silenced. But their outcry was more powerful than all the measures meant to silence it, or sought even to resolve it by decisions that increased its gravity by falling into complicity. The Lord heard that cry and once again showed us on which side he stands. Mary’s song is not mistaken and continues quietly to echo throughout history. For the Lord remembers the promise he made to our fathers: “he has scattered the proud in their conceit; he has cast down the mighty from their thrones and lifted up the lowly; he has filled the hungry with good things, and the rich he has sent away empty” (Lk 1:51-53). We feel shame when we realize that our style of life has denied, and continues to deny, the words we recite.

With shame and repentance, we acknowledge as an ecclesial community that we were not where we should have been, that we did not act in a timely manner, realizing the magnitude and the gravity of the damage done to so many lives. We showed no care for the little ones; we abandoned them. I make my own the words of the then Cardinal Ratzinger when, during the Way of the Cross composed for Good Friday 2005, he identified with the cry of pain of so many victims and exclaimed: “How much filth there is in the Church, and even among those who, in the priesthood, ought to belong entirely to [Christ]! How much pride, how much self-complacency! Christ’s betrayal by his disciples, their unworthy reception of his body and blood, is certainly the greatest suffering endured by the Redeemer; it pierces his heart. We can only call to him from the depths of our hearts: Kyrie eleison – Lord, save us! (cf. Mt 8:25)” (Ninth Station).

2. … all suffer together with it

The extent and the gravity of all that has happened requires coming to grips with this reality in a comprehensive and communal way. While it is important and necessary on every journey of conversion to acknowledge the truth of what has happened, in itself this is not enough. Today we are challenged as the People of God to take on the pain of our brothers and sisters wounded in their flesh and in their spirit. If, in the past, the response was one of omission, today we want solidarity, in the deepest and most challenging sense, to become our way of forging present and future history. And this in an environment where conflicts, tensions and above all the victims of every type of abuse can encounter an outstretched hand to protect them and rescue them from their pain (cf. Evangelii Gaudium, 228). Such solidarity demands that we in turn condemn whatever endangers the integrity of any person. A solidarity that summons us to fight all forms of corruption, especially spiritual corruption. The latter is “a comfortable and self-satisfied form of blindness. Everything then appears acceptable: deception, slander, egotism and other subtle forms of self-centeredness, for ‘even Satan disguises himself as an angel of light’ (2 Cor 11:14)” (Gaudete et Exsultate, 165). Saint Paul’s exhortation to suffer with those who suffer is the best antidote against all our attempts to repeat the words of Cain: “Am I my brother’s keeper?” (Gen 4:9).

I am conscious of the effort and work being carried out in various parts of the world to come up with the necessary means to ensure the safety and protection of the integrity of children and of vulnerable adults, as well as implementing zero tolerance and ways of making all those who perpetrate or cover up these crimes accountable. We have delayed in applying these actions and sanctions that are so necessary, yet I am confident that they will help to guarantee a greater culture of care in the present and future.

Together with those efforts, every one of the baptized should feel involved in the ecclesial and social change that we so greatly need. This change calls for a personal and communal conversion that makes us see things as the Lord does. For as Saint John Paul II liked to say: “If we have truly started out anew from the contemplation of Christ, we must learn to see him especially in the faces of those with whom he wished to be identified” (Novo Millennio Ineunte, 49). To see things as the Lord does, to be where the Lord wants us to be, to experience a conversion of heart in his presence. To do so, prayer and penance will help. I invite the entire holy faithful People of God to a penitential exercise of prayer and fasting, following the Lord’s command.[1] This can awaken our conscience and arouse our solidarity and commitment to a culture of care that says “never again” to every form of abuse.

It is impossible to think of a conversion of our activity as a Church that does not include the active participation of all the members of God’s People. Indeed, whenever we have tried to replace, or silence, or ignore, or reduce the People of God to small elites, we end up creating communities, projects, theological approaches, spiritualities and structures without roots, without memory, without faces, without bodies and ultimately, without lives.[2] This is clearly seen in a peculiar way of understanding the Church’s authority, one common in many communities where sexual abuse and the abuse of power and conscience have occurred. Such is the case with clericalism, an approach that “not only nullifies the character of Christians, but also tends to diminish and undervalue the baptismal grace that the Holy Spirit has placed in the heart of our people”.[3] Clericalism, whether fostered by priests themselves or by lay persons, leads to an excision in the ecclesial body that supports and helps to perpetuate many of the evils that we are condemning today. To say “no” to abuse is to say an emphatic “no” to all forms of clericalism.

It is always helpful to remember that “in salvation history, the Lord saved one people. We are never completely ourselves unless we belong to a people. That is why no one is saved alone, as an isolated individual. Rather, God draws us to himself, taking into account the complex fabric of interpersonal relationships present in the human community. God wanted to enter into the life and history of a people” (Gaudete et Exsultate, 6). Consequently, the only way that we have to respond to this evil that has darkened so many lives is to experience it as a task regarding all of us as the People of God. This awareness of being part of a people and a shared history will enable us to acknowledge our past sins and mistakes with a penitential openness that can allow us to be renewed from within. Without the active participation of all the Church’s members, everything being done to uproot the culture of abuse in our communities will not be successful in generating the necessary dynamics for sound and realistic change. The penitential dimension of fasting and prayer will help us as God’s People to come before the Lord and our wounded brothers and sisters as sinners imploring forgiveness and the grace of shame and conversion. In this way, we will come up with actions that can generate resources attuned to the Gospel. For “whenever we make the effort to return to the source and to recover the original freshness of the Gospel, new avenues arise, new paths of creativity open up, with different forms of expression, more eloquent signs and words with new meaning for today’s world” (Evangelii Gaudium, 11).

It is essential that we, as a Church, be able to acknowledge and condemn, with sorrow and shame, the atrocities perpetrated by consecrated persons, clerics, and all those entrusted with the mission of watching over and caring for those most vulnerable. Let us beg forgiveness for our own sins and the sins of others. An awareness of sin helps us to acknowledge the errors, the crimes and the wounds caused in the past and allows us, in the present, to be more open and committed along a journey of renewed conversion.

Likewise, penance and prayer will help us to open our eyes and our hearts to other people’s sufferings and to overcome the thirst for power and possessions that are so often the root of those evils. May fasting and prayer open our ears to the hushed pain felt by children, young people and the disabled. A fasting that can make us hunger and thirst for justice and impel us to walk in the truth, supporting all the judicial measures that may be necessary. A fasting that shakes us up and leads us to be committed in truth and charity with all men and women of good will, and with society in general, to combatting all forms of the abuse of power, sexual abuse and the abuse of conscience.

In this way, we can show clearly our calling to be “a sign and instrument of communion with God and of the unity of the entire human race” (Lumen Gentium, 1).

“If one member suffers, all suffer together with it”, said Saint Paul. By an attitude of prayer and penance, we will become attuned as individuals and as a community to this exhortation, so that we may grow in the gift of compassion, in justice, prevention and reparation. Mary chose to stand at the foot of her Son’s cross. She did so unhesitatingly, standing firmly by Jesus’ side. In this way, she reveals the way she lived her entire life. When we experience the desolation caused by these ecclesial wounds, we will do well, with Mary, “to insist more upon prayer”, seeking to grow all the more in love and fidelity to the Church (SAINT IGNATIUS OF LOYOLA, Spiritual Exercises, 319). She, the first of the disciples, teaches all of us as disciples how we are to halt before the sufferings of the innocent, without excuses or cowardice. To look to Mary is to discover the model of a true follower of Christ.

May the Holy Spirit grant us the grace of conversion and the interior anointing needed to express before these crimes of abuse our compunction and our resolve courageously to combat them.

FRANCIS

Vatican City, 20 August 2018

Mass in the Grass/Picnic

PARISH PICNIC

NEXT Sunday, August 12

Mass in the Grass begins at:
Noon
on our parish grounds

Picnic following Mass (1:00pm)

Cost: Free

A complete hog dog lunch will be
provided (hot dog, chips, water and dessert).

Limited metal chairs will be provided. Feel free to bring your own comfy chair and a
non-alcohol drink.

Join us for a fun afternoon